You are currently viewing the aggregator for the Distributed Republic reader blogs. You can surf to any author's blog by clicking on the link at the bottom of one of his/her posts. If you wish to participate, feel free to register (at the top of the right sidebar) and start blogging.

The main page of the blog can be found here.

Spam Law Failing

From Information Week:

Postini rolled out its January 2004 data on Wednesday, and said that new law or not, spam is still clogging in-boxes. In January, spam accounted for 79% of all the messages that Postini processed for its 2,000-plus business customers, a tiny fall-off from the 80% logged in December 2003.

"The CAN-SPAM Act appears to have had little immediate effect on the amount of unwanted E-mail," said Andrew Lochart, Postini's director of product marketing.


Free to Choose

In a follow-up entitled "Tale of the Serf", Brad DeLong gives the hypothetical:

Here are two situations:

In the first, you are a free and independent peasant living in a village. Your field is your own. Your crops are you own. After working, you huddle before the fire in your peasant hut until you fall asleep. A smallpox epidemic comes. You, your spouse and your children all die.


Collective Action vs. Collectivism

Sunday night, I along with millions of Americans took part in an annual tradition all across the country - the Super Bowl Party. The Super Bowl Party is unique in that its focus is often not on the game itself. Yes, this year's game was one of the most exciting ever, but history has shown that more often than not, the matchup is lopsided, and the action on the field is often superceded by the new commericials that are debuted. More than anything though, the Super Bowl Party is simply... a party. Friends get together to share good times and enjoy each others' company. Read more »


Just less of the bad

Andy Duncan thought he was coming to the Land of the Free. Instead, he got smoking bans and Red Square style architectural monstrosities. But it does look like he enjoyed his Sangria, er... Sam Adams, immensely.


US Health Care: Socialism-Lite

I had largely forgotten about it until I saw a similar comment at Outside the Beltway. A couple of weeks ago, Mithras of the blog Fables of the Reconstruction, in response to my calling the proposals by the various Democratic candidates "full-blown socialism" states in comments that follow the post: Read more »


More Reductio Creep


The administration should be throwing its weight behind the anti-obesity strategy instead of fighting it. Its current stance has nothing to do with health and everything to do with the political power of Big Food ? and especially Big Sugar.

It used to be that terms like "Big Food" and "Big Sugar" were used as facetious analogues of "Big Tobacco" by The Onion. But as far as I can tell, the NY Times is completely serious.


Close Enough for Government Work

The U.S. tally now stands at five out of six. That's an 87 percent batting average.

- Edward Weiler, NASA's chief space scientist


Carnival of the Capitalists


A Team of Destiny (or is it Dynasty?)

How about the Pats?

patriotssuperbowl.jpg

Some pictures I took last night in the Back Bay after the game:

boylston1.jpg

boylston2.jpg
Read more »


One Year Ago Today



earthmoon.jpg

...When I think of heaven

Deliver me in a black-winged bird

I think of dying

Lay me down in a field of flame and heather

Render up my body into the burning heart of God

Read more »


Art by fiat

bird.jpgThe leader of the party of small government is proposing an increase in the budget for the National Endowment for the Arts of $15 - $20 million, the largest increase in two decades.

A quote from near the end of the article caught my eye: Read more »


Ken's Law of Economic Regulation

From the Alien Landscape Weblog:

You cannot regulate only one side of an economic exchange. Any law or regulation stated in terms of limiting the actions of one side can be restated in terms of limiting the actions of the other side without changing its meaning or effect.

A (voluntary) economic exchange happens when both sides prefer the terms to all of their available alternatives. Thus, any regulation that forbids certain terms will act to limit the options of both sides.


Carnival of the Capitalists


Oh no he did-ent!

From the LA Times (free registration required):

At the Economic Policy Institute, Ettlinger said unless the low-wage job shift identified by the institute is reversed, the nation's wage base will shrink and individual workers will have an increasingly difficult time finding quality jobs.

Blog Bits

Kevin Brancato's already outstanding Truck and Barter is even better now as a group blog.

Speaking of group blogs, there's a new one called Radical Cowboys that's worth checking out.

Andrew Chamberlain is blogging again.

New blog startup Wonkette should make interesting reading during this election year. [via Instapundit]