Guns in Houston

This was posted on a message board I visit by someone in Houston.

I actually saw on the news that humidity is 100% percent downtown, didn't know that was possible. i finally charged my phone, but no service here. we will likely stay here for a while as centerpoint friends tell me could be 2-3 weeks. For at least as long as there is no power- very frustrating because downtown (underground grid) is only a few blocks away and we can see the lights.

It's very surreal. We've only seen some major damage, but the extent of (relatively) minor damage is amazing. Trees and power poles are down everywhere, windows broken downtown, glass and computers/office furniture in the street, the bayous are all pushing their banks and many roads are impassible- everywhere, but downtown got hit hard. There are no billboards and the street signs are all crooked if not flattened. We've heard from most of our friends and everyone's okay- but clean-up's going to be a #####. So far looting has not been a problem- everyone has guns and they are not afraid or restricted by law to use them on anyone they think may be illegally on their own or their neighbor's property. Maybe there is some sense to that after all.

We're okay, we're just really stressed out.

(Bold mine)

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Locke 1 Hobbes 0

Locke versus Hobbes.

Hobbes:

Our knowledge of objective, true answers on such questions is so feeble, so slight and imperfect as to be mostly worthless in resolving practical disputes. In a state of nature people cannot know what is theirs and what is someone else’s. Property exists solely by the will of the state, thus in a state of nature men are condemned to endless violent conflict. In practice morality is for the most part merely a command by some person or group or God, and law merely the momentary will of the ruler.

Locke:

Humans know what is right and wrong, and are capable of knowing what is lawful and unlawful well enough to resolve conflicts. In particular, and most importantly, they are capable of telling the difference between what is theirs and what belongs to someone else. Regrettably they do not always act in accordance with this knowledge.

Locke 5, Hobbes 0