McCain: yes, he really is a racist

In the effort to continue to provide you, dear readers, with groundbreaking content, I've hired presidential candidate and total asshole John McCain to say stupid things with a straight face. I've also arranged partnerships with the mainstream media not to bat an eyelash when he says these things to, so that they won't be competing for the same stories.

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- Republican presidential hopeful John McCain taunted rival Mitt Romney on immigration Monday, saying the former Massachusetts governor should "get out his small-varmint gun and drive those Guatemalans off his lawn."

I don't understand the distinction people can make: joking about shooting US citizens is unacceptable, but joking about shooting citizens of other arbitrary geographical areas is fine.

Further, it's somehow acceptable to joke about Hispanics, but McCain would naturally never make the same kind of joke about whites or Asians. Or blacks either, but only out of fear of Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton leading the righteous media charge to crucify him. Good thing for him that they can't get publicity from this comment.

Share this

The reference to Guatemalans

The reference to Guatemalans wasn't arbitrary. McCain's dig references Romney's false claim to be a varmint hunter and his opposition to illegal immigration while having supposedly employed Guatemalans who entered the country illegally. I hardly think such a dig makes one a racist.

I don't mean that McCain

I don't mean that McCain picked that nationality arbitrarily, I mean that borders are typically drawn arbitrarily, and being born in one does not confer a different moral status than being born in another.

A joke

McCain was zinging Romney because of the reasons stated. If you don't have a sense of humor, you should try to become friends with someone who does, so that they could explain to you when someone is joking.

A Few Thoughts

In relation to this:
I mean that borders are typically drawn arbitrarily, and being born in one does not confer a different moral status than being born in another.

First, borders aren't always drawn arbitrarily--they often reflect anything from geographical boundaries to the resolution of violent conflict over disputed lands.

Second, while I would agree that being born in one country does not confer differing moral status from a person born in another country, it certainly does confer a different legal status on both sides of that imaginary (if not arbitrary) line.