The War for Oil

Lot of hot air in the Windy City lately.

Chicago's aldermen, the guys behind the wage control proposal for 'big box' stores, have proposed yet another act of legislative power: a ban on trans-fat oils in all of the city's restaurants. Ald. Edward Burke informs us that "Chicago has the opportunity to take a bold step and protect its citizens from the ravages of unhealthy trans fats by banning their use in restaurants."

The ripple effects?

“The sad reality is there will be restaurants that will be hurt: your mom-and-pop restaurants and your ethnic restaurants,” said Colleen McShane, president of the Illinois Restaurant Association. “A lot of them cannot afford other types of oils.”

Mayor Richard Daley also believes the City Council is going too far, asking, "Is the City Council going to plan our menus?”

No need to fear. Comrade Burke has a solution.

If mom-and-pop restaurants would be unfairly harmed, (Burke) said, perhaps he would agree to rewrite the legislation to single out only fast-food chains.

Much like the wage control where they decided to single out retailers exceeding a certain square footage, Burke is willing to "pick n' choose" who gets nailed by the fatty oil law. Ah, much better. :dizzy:

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Much like the wage control

Much like the wage control where they decided to single out retailers exceeding a certain square footage

Surely you jest, since as we all know, the problem with large retailers is that they charge low wages. Logically, it must follow, from the criticism of retailers like Walmart, that small retailers pay relatively high wages, for otherwise the criticism would not be limited to the large retailers. :)

restaurants can't afford to

restaurants can't afford to use better oils? Maybe they could just raise their prices by 3 cents a plate to make up the difference. The city doesn't have a right to ban what people eat, but thats still a stupid objection.

Nothing like a bit of

Nothing like a bit of protectionist regulation to protect the Big-Bad Business from Mom & Pop. How, exactly, does McDonalds differ from Mr Beef or any other restaurant that serves your food within 3 minutes?

Or does Mr. Burke just mean the national chains?

Constant, With all the fuss

Constant,
With all the fuss about transfats, I'm sure a lot of restaurants are switching to different oils as we speak.
You could probably speed up the process slightly by asking what oils things are cooked in when you go out to eat. These places want your business, and if they have to switch cooking oils to keep it a lot of them will do that. Of course, it takes more than one person saying this, but with the rhetorical climate the way it is, I'm sure lots of people will be saying it.

We make the objections we

We make the objections we can. Proclaiming that the law "violates my inalienable rights" stopped working in the 1910s.

Maybe they could just raise

Maybe they could just raise their prices by 3 cents a plate to make up the difference.

I do wish they would use better oils. Perhaps if people became more educated on the matter then the demand for food cooked in better oils would emerge to the point that some restaurants would switch to better oils. I believe that this mechanism has worked in the past to change the menu.

Wrong method, right action.

Wrong method, right action. Return to frying in lard.

- Josh