Recently, US control over the domain name system (which manages the assignment of domain names like www.yahoo.com, to IP addresses like 68.142.226.36) has come under scrutiny. At the U.N. World Summit on the Information Society, an agreement was eventually reached, whereby the US would continue to maintain control. While I doubt this is the last we'll hear of this debate, and I'm glad it's been put-off at least for now, I also think that it represents nothing more than a bunch of ignorant bureaucrats trying to exercise power over something that they don't really understand. In response to concern, US lawmakers passed H.Con.Res. 268, to keep oversight in the hands of the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN).

Certainly the service provided was an important step in the evolution and mass adoption of the internet. But with today's behemoths like Yahoo, Google, and Microsoft falling over themselves to make sense of the constantly-evolving internet for the millions who access it, I wonder if it's still as important as we think.

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