All Ben Shapiro Really Needs Is Some Serious Deep-Dickin’: Part III

In what is, unsurprisingly, becoming an enormously popular series, I present you with your Ben Shapiro quote of the day:

On the other hand, I'm grateful to Senator Kerry for having pointed out to me the social utility of these songs. Petey Pablo is the black Byron. Terror Squad is urban Tennyson. Cassidy and R. Kelly are the Walt Whitmans of da 'hood. The importance of these lyrics is surpassed only by Winston Churchill's "Iron Curtain" speech in the pantheon of important social statements of the last century. Censorship of this sparkling artisty would be the equivalent of banning Renoir.

- Shapiro, Ben. Porn Generation: How Social Liberalism Is Corrupting Our Future, Washington, DC: Regnery, 2005. 68

Byron, you say?

Byron's fame rests not only on his writings, but also on his life, which featured extravagant living, numerous love affairs, debts, separation, allegations of incest and bisexuality and an eventual death from fever after he travelled to fight on the Greek side in the Greek War of Independence.

And though there is not much dirt on Tennyson, Walt Whitman makes R. Kelly look chaste.

A Song of Joys

In winter I take my eel-basket and eel-spear and travel out
on foot on the ice ~ I have a small axe to cut holes in
the ice.

Behold me well-clothed going gayly or returning in the
afternoon, my brood of tough boys accompanying me,

My brood of grown and part-grown boys, who love to be with
no one else so well as they love to be with me,

By day to work with me, and by night to sleep with me.

- Walt Whitman, Leaves of Grass

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Maybe your response makes

Maybe your response makes sense in context, but all I get from this excerpt is that Shapiro doesn't think that the quality of modern popular lyrics is on par with that of the poetry of Byron, Tennyson, and Whitman. IMO, anything sufficiently short is better than Whitman, that seems like a fair assessment to me, although I can't help wondering why he felt the need to say something so obvious. But I guess that might make sense in context, too.

Sounds like a fair point

Sounds like a fair point then.

This is so funny I am almost

This is so funny I am almost tempted to go get a copy, just to giggle along.

Not really. If he wants to

Not really. If he wants to show how today's generation of artists are deviant and over-sexed, he probably should have chosen some better examples of chaste poets of the past.

You are merely learning what

You are merely learning what World O'Crap and Sadly, No! knew. It can be fun to mock cultural conservatives.

I myself have yet to

I myself have yet to understand Whitman. I'm assured some find him enjoyable.

I didn't even realize he was

I didn't even realize he was being sarcastic until I saw the Tennyson reference. Byron and Whitman suck.

Well then I certainly agree

Well then I certainly agree with him.

Right, but then his

Right, but then his counterpoint is only that poets of the past appealed to higher quality prurient interests. In which case, if the literary quality of rap is all he cared about, he wouldn't have included it in a book about our pornographic culture.

I thought his point was that

I thought his point was that rap appeals to low quality prurient interests. At least, that's what you said. And it seems true enough.

Brandon, Shapiro's point,

Brandon,

Shapiro's point, given the theme of his book, is not only that rap appeals to low quality interests, but that it appeals to low quality prurient interests.