Wow, I think I\'m in love.

Mad props to Jacqueline for single handedly taking on several of my co-bloggers faster than I could even read the comments. Wow! Well done, Jacqueline.

Anyway, a point or two - I did not quote you on points 2 and 3 because I have no argument against it being less costly to administer or being less intrusive, and my pointing out, with examples, that it is the poor who pay most dearly for property taxes should be sufficient argument for your point #3. Hence no need to quote you on it.

I did not intend to start a debate on anarchy, but ... might I suggest that when you are out cutting deals that would make most CEO's jealous, insist on a private arbitration clause in any contracts you enter into. I don't know why anyone would want to use a government court. :wink:

It was fun anyway. I do hope you'd let me buy you a drink or three if we're ever in the same town.

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"It was fun anyway. I do

"It was fun anyway. I do hope you’d let me buy you a drink or three if we’re ever in the same town."

Heh heh, sure. Hopefully it will be after my moratorium on men has expired. :)

I suggest Jackie pick up a

I suggest Jackie pick up a copy of Hoppe's "Democracy: The God that Failed" and read the chapter called: On the Errors of Classical Liberalism and the Future of Liberty. Hopefully that will bring her to her senses.

Don’t take that advice,

Don’t take that advice, Jackie. Nothing by Hoppe is worth reading. If you want to risk being converted to anarcho-capitalism, read David Friedman. (I’m not an anarchist myself, but if anyone could convert me, it would be DF.)

Like Dave, I find Hoppe worth reading. His arguments about how democratic legislators have distorted higher rates of time preference than private property owners goes along nicely with the public choice economics arguments of how self-interest does not disappear in the political realm.

But for intuitively appealing arguments for market anarchism, it's hard to beat David Friedman.

Eh, I read some DF a couple

Eh, I read some DF a couple years ago and remained unconvinced. Maybe I’ll read more some day but it’s rather low on the to-do list.

Did you read The Machinery of Freedom or perhaps just his more general economics books? How about the essays his website on medieval Iceland, efficient law, and law as a private good? All of the arguments that you used are countered in those works.

I'm not being skeptical, but when you things like, "So under this system I could just declare myself to be an arbitator, start issuing deportation and death decrees, and if people carried them out that would be OK?" and make arguments about how the poor benefit from monopolies, it seems like if you did read the above, you did not really grasp the arguments that stem from the economic analysis of violence.

There are some arguments against polycentric law that I consider strong arguments. For example, Tyler Cowen has argued that security and law are actually public goods and tend toward collusionist incentives. I disagree with him, like Friedman does, in that under monopolistic law, law is indeed a public good, but that under polycentric legal system, law is a private good and demonstrates incentives against collusions. But at least it is a thoughtful argument based on economics.

While these issues might superficially appear to not deal with the "real world", the economic ideas that underlie them do apply to everyday law - focal benefits/dispersed costs, federalism, public choice economics, the role of the UN, medical marijuana, the Ukraine's latest election, the Iraq War, NGOs, tax havens, etc. I encourage you to at least give DF another shot, with an open mind, and prove to yourself that he is wrong.

Don't take that advice,

Don't take that advice, Jackie. Nothing by Hoppe is worth reading. If you want to risk being converted to anarcho-capitalism, read David Friedman. (I'm not an anarchist myself, but if anyone could convert me, it would be DF.)

Ok, then I recommend De

Ok, then I recommend De Jasay's Against Politics.

http://www.lfb.com/index.php?deptid=&parentid=&stocknumber=PP7686&page=1&itemsperpage=24

Eh, I read some DF a couple

Eh, I read some DF a couple years ago and remained unconvinced. Maybe I'll read more some day but it's rather low on the to-do list.

I find Hoppe worth reading,

I find Hoppe worth reading, he is always interesting and challenging, but not something I'd recommend for convincing someone of an argument.

I gotta agree with Glen on

I gotta agree with Glen on this one.