Shock-Jock Terror Threat raised to Orange

It's been fairly easy finding whacky quotes since the aftermath of February 1 (Superbowl Breastgate), and the subsequent FCC crackdown on those dangerous radio DJs, these past few weeks.

When commenting on Clear Channel's decision to yank the popular Howard Stern show off six radio affiliates due to impending FCC pressure, Daniel Weiss of Focus on Family speaks for everyone:

People just don't want to be bombarded with this sort of misogynistic, lewd and adolescent ranting anymore.

Despite there being no consumer surveys or Arbitron ratings indicating that Stern's show has been losing a significant amount of listeners lately, Weiss hoped that "Clear Channel's decision would convince (Stern) his brand of 'humor' has become pass?". As if the FCC is the national pulse of what consumers find hot or not.

Meanwhile, Linda Chavez of townhall.com compared Stern's show to a company dumping raw sewage into the drinking water supply.

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Can you broadcast whatever

Can you broadcast whatever you want so long as you do it from your own property?

Can you and your wife parade around naked or have hot kinky sex in your front lawn right in front of your neighbors and their children?

I guess you neighbors and their children have no business even looking over at your property, so technically it is their fault.

???

Not a very strong

Not a very strong comparison.

Much like Internet websites, one has to physically make an effort to click on a radio, and tune into a specific frequency on the AM/FM band at a specific time of day, to hear sexual or low-brow humor. I'd have to actively seek it out.

Meanwhile, I could unavoidably hear and see a couple having kinky sex on their front lawn next door. The stimuli (sight/sound) could "enter" my home uninvited.

Doug Allen: Much like

Doug Allen: Much like Internet websites, one has to physically make an effort to click on a radio, and tune into a specific frequency on the AM/FM band at a specific time of day, to hear sexual or low-brow humor. I'd have to actively seek it out.

If we were talking cable TV, or satellite radio (i.e. subscription services) then I would agree with you completely, but we no longer exist in the 1920?s. Today a radio is as common as eyeglasses or refrigerators.

Doug Allen: Meanwhile, I could unavoidably hear and see a couple having kinky sex on their front lawn next door. The stimuli (sight/sound) could "enter" my home uninvited.

Stern (as an example) is broadcasting on the Public airwaves, not on a private frequency that only subscribers can access.

Or are you suggesting we set a minimum age required to purchase a radio, kind of like the minimum age required to buy alcohol?

Or are you suggesting we set

Or are you suggesting we set a minimum age required to purchase a radio, kind of like the minimum age required to buy alcohol?

No, and the alcohol minimum wage likely created a "forbidden fruit" aura that exacerbated the infamous 'underage drinking' problem.

Parental control and oversight of their own child's behavior is what I'd suggest. It's a parent's responsibility to steer childrens' entertainment intake to programming such as Finding Nemo, Natalie Merchant, and American Idol, and away from humor Howard Stern, 50 Cent, Married With Children, and South Park, if they so choose.

But the underlying issue is this: Those who want Stern booted off the air are merely using children as a strawman argument here. If we check the demographics that listen to Stern and his ilk, very few under 18 listen to his show. And essentially no one under 12 even knows who he is. Even if they were home alone, with unlimited access to radio (they are usually in school anyway), nearly all teens and pre-teens invariably prefer to listen to their CDs, chat on their phone, download music, surf the net, or play video games.

Ironically, far more kids own explicit and misogynist music CDs - an item someone would have to go out and physically purchase - than those who listen to talk-radio DJs or watch E! Wild On, both available with a click of a button.

I submit those railing against radio hosts like Howard Stern just simply detest his presence on the air [the same people who have no problem with graphic descriptions of bloody war scenes on NPR, but get upset over a penis n' fart joke]. Never mind the fact that in a typical large city, there are literally dozens of radio formats to choose from.

The market does a good enough job of keeping "good taste" in the mix of entertainment and deciding what gets aired, without the FCC having to put a halt to what some people consider indescent or adolescent. Culture is fluid, and if a bare behind on NYPD Blue doesn't meet a flood of complaints an sponsor boycotts, then consumers' tolerances are simply changing.

A side-note... I am indeed excited about satellite radio and its growing popularity. Not because I desire nonstop R-rated entertainment someday, but the competition and variety of music-sports-information formats will give the FM stalwarts a run for their money.

Before 9/11 the shock jocks

Before 9/11 the shock jocks used to love to play with our site on the air and sometimes list it as the site of the day.
This is the blurb I sent them.

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Find out your nickname before entering the cellblock. www.prisonbitchname.com
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