The creed of necessity

Brian Micklethwait of Samizdata gives his thoughts on the necessity of compulsory purchase for transportation routes, spinning off a comment by Patrick Crozier in response to a post about Segway on Transport blog to which David Sucher of City Comforts Blog also responded on his own blog.

I see where David is coming from; there is currently no easy answer to the holdout problem. But ideas and advances often come in great spurts between long lags. Even though Aristotle questioned the nature of economic value, an elegant solution was not described until almost 2000 years later, even though millions of people in between pondered their lifetimes for an answer. Just because difficult questions do not appear to have answers today does not mean they do not have answers at all.

The reason that Transport Blog is under "Current Favorites" in the right sidebar is that Patrick Crozier doesn't accept the necessity plea so easily, often bringing up ideas which may sound 'crazy' to the average man on the street, but every breakthrough and every pioneer in civilization is first labeled 'crazy'. It is the inability of people to see past the Here and Now, their immediate situation, their smallness in the larger scheme of things, that allows labels such as 'unreasonable' and 'obvious' to bring about acceptance of coercion.

And as Brian eloquently states, necessity has often been used to exact control by the power structure, whether it be the King or the democratic populace.

A free market in Transport would be one of the great advances of human societies. Rather than accepting the prevailing premises, why not give it a shot and see what happens?

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"A free market in Transport

"A free market in Transport would be one of the great advances of human societies. Rather than accepting the prevailing premises, why not give it a shot and see what happens?"

I agree entirely. And it would be nice to hear some ideas, theories, scenarios etc etc of how we can get there. I have heard none which deal with the "holdout" problem in a persuasive way.

There is a difference between Desire and Possibility.